Brother Maces classic lines?

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MoanaLiza
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Brother Maces classic lines?

Post by MoanaLiza »

Was only in Knightmare for two seasons, but I thought that there were a few classic incidents and lines that made me smile or laugh. There were also a couple of puns also. For example the joker incident during Giles quest and the scene with the assassin, etc.

Can any of you think of any classic incidents, lines or puns by or involving Brother Mace?
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Re:Brother Maces classic lines?

Post by Thanatos »

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Re:Brother Maces classic lines?

Post by Malefact »

I think the word 'iocus' was mispronounced, though. From what I know of Latin, the letter 'i' can be consonantal (and some schools of thought represent such an 'i' with a 'j' - hence 'jocus', which sounds more like the English equivalent). I think it is in this case. Getting to the point, I think 'iocus' is pronounced 'yock-ous' as opposed to 'eye-oh-cuhs'.

The 'descendant' line in series 5 is funny, imo. :)
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Re:Brother Maces classic lines?

Post by Thanatos »

It's either "yok-us" or "yoke-us". The stress is probably on the first syllable.
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Re:Brother Maces classic lines?

Post by Drassil »

His pronunciation of 'regina' (queen) when playing cards with Hands in Series 5 was also off; but his Latin was still fluent overall!

I loved all of Brother Mace's appearances - it's hard to narrow it down to a few 'classic' ones. The one I rewatched most recently was his encounter with goblin-Christopher in Series 5. Very entertaining!
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Re:Brother Maces classic lines?

Post by darkDescender »

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Re:Brother Maces classic lines?

Post by Tom41 »

What about all that stuff he said in Latin? I'm curious to know what he was talking about when he gave Latin statements to the dungeoneer (who didn't understand) or when he muttered to himself.

I remember one time he muttered to himself "Ignoramus maximus" when the dungeoneer said he couldn't speak Latin. I can guess what that particular phrase means, but we'd really need a Latin speaker to translate the other stuff he says.
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Re:Brother Maces classic lines?

Post by Thanatos »

"Ignoramus maximus" is dog Latin because "ignoramus", although a noun in English, is a part of a verb in Latin: the first person plural present indicative active of "ignoro" - "not to know". The upshot of which is that it means, "We don't know".
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Re:Brother Maces classic lines?

Post by Drassil »

During Series 4, Brother Mace says something like, 'sacra templa porta taberna quaerabat'. Which, bearing in mind who's speaking, roughly translates as: 'one was searching for a sacred temple - the doorway of an inn.'

Edit: I've since concluded that he more likely said, "sacra templa poeta taberna quaerabat", which can be very loosely translated as: the priest seeks the temple, the poet seeks the pub. Hence Brother Mace's subsequent remark that a poet would like the joke, but a priest would consider it lousy.
Last edited by Drassil on 08 Jul 2008, 16:11, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Brother Maces classic lines?

Post by Canadanne »

I think I'm doing OK at translating Brother Mace's Latin lines so far in Series 4, but I'm stuck on this one. It's in episode 9 when Simon sits down at the table with him. He points upward (not sure if he's indicating Simon's advisors or God) and says something that sounds like "Ah, felix el fecissime". I know that felix means fortunate or happy, and felicissime would mean "most fortunately" or "most happily", but I can't figure out the words he uses or what he's trying to say. (The only similar word I could find is "fecisse" meaning "to have done/made".) Can anyone give me an accurate transcription of this line and what it means?
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Re: Re:Brother Maces classic lines?

Post by Canadanne »

Drassil wrote:Edit: I've since concluded that he more likely said, "sacra templa poeta taberna quaerabat", which can be very loosely translated as: the priest seeks the temple, the poet seeks the pub. Hence Brother Mace's subsequent remark that a poet would like the joke, but a priest would consider it lousy.
Apologies if you already knew this, but I only just discovered that Brother Mace's "joke" is actually taken from a Latin textbook, where it's an example of a sentence that omits a repeated word. It's supposed to be "Sacerdos templum, poeta tabernam quaerebat", so he mangles it a bit!
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