Phrases used in Knightmare

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Picklemyfav
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Re: Phrases used in Knightmare

Post by Picklemyfav » Thu Nov 17, 2016 4:41 pm

Pooka wrote:
Picklemyfav wrote:is root and fern a phrase used by elves to show surprise and shock or is it an elf version of swearing?
I think that the phrase used by Pickle is "rook and fen!" - a rook is a scavenging bird similar to a crow, and a fen is a type of wetland; there are some famous ones in the East of England.

I think it's a reasonable assumption that Pickle is just using nature-related words as an exclamation of surprise. It also rhymes with "glen", as in "there's something stirring in this...".
AAAAAHHHhhhhhhhhhhhhhh.................. that's what he's doing........ showing surprise............ I couldn't picture Pickle swearing......... that's why when I was so shocked when I was told he was........ I was also told that Pickle swears like a trooper by the same person..... guess Pickle would call him a stupid fool for winding me up....
Cedric kneed down close to my helmet so i could see him and told me.
"You're not witless. You're just nice. Too nice really for your own good. That's your main problem."

Drassil
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Re: Phrases used in Knightmare

Post by Drassil » Tue Dec 06, 2016 9:51 pm

Canadanne wrote:Thanks for contributing to this thread, you guys - I wasn't sure if anyone would respond!
A thread like this is not for everyone, but there's more than enough room on this discussion forum of ours for it and I for one enhance my appreciation of Knightmare by joining in. Since most of our theories cannot easily be proved or disproved, and we are all capable of approaching Knightmare with a sense of humour too, I don't see that it does any harm. If we chase thirty deeper meanings and only find one, for me it is still highly rewarding.
pjmlfc05 wrote:
Mystara wrote:Of course, it could just be random sounding magical words that occurred to/were heard by Clifford/Tim.
I think this would be closer to the truth and would be most likely!
Canadanne wrote:The words themselves may well be random, though names and spells in Knightmare do tend to have a basis in existing languages.
Perhaps it's worth adding that a lot of the Latin sounding words in Knightmare were genuine Latin. There were also authentic literary references throughout the series (Shakespeare, Marlowe, Dante, Carroll, Tolkien - the Knightmare Lexicon has details). There's also evidence of at least one Knightmare character being partly named after a real person who was close to the production. I think it's too easy to dismiss absolutely everything as made up. The same goes for the Knightmare gamebooks, which contain some fun but subtle in-jokes of their own.
Canadanne wrote:Also, what's the origin of "Caras carom" and does it have a literal translation? He uses that to express a range of emotions including frustration, horror and delight.
I remember Robin/Mashibinbin once suggesting that the residence of Hordriss could be called Castle Carascaram. (We had Hordriss planned as a Knightmare RPG character at one point.) Whenever I try to consider the origin of the phrase, I end up imagining Hordriss singing along to The Pink Panther theme.

This thread might be a useful place to note some of Knightmare's other mysterious incantations. Here are a few that come to mind. My phonetics are only approximate.

Morghanna in Series 3, preparing to zap Martin: "Dahrius ivah. An end to the quest"

Lord Fear in Series 6, freezing Matt: "Epassipum vaydellum"

Lord Fear in Series 8, turning Maldame to stone: "Zalas caranaffa"

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Re: Phrases used in Knightmare

Post by Canadanne » Wed Dec 07, 2016 12:32 am

Drassil wrote:This thread might be a useful place to note some of Knightmare's other mysterious incantations. Here are a few that come to mind. My phonetics are only approximate.

Morghanna in Series 3, preparing to zap Martin: "Dahrius ivah. An end to the quest"

Lord Fear in Series 6, freezing Matt: "Epassipum vaydellum"

Lord Fear in Series 8, turning Maldame to stone: "Zalas caranaffa"
Yes, I often wonder about those incantations too! (Morghanna's could definitely be borrowed from somewhere in the real world.) The one by Lord Fear that sounds to me like "Epacsepom vedelos" starts with ESCAPE backwards (which the clue scroll explicitly tells them to reverse), so it feels like the rest of it should have some meaning as well, but perhaps they just tried to make it into something Latin-sounding. "Vedelos" could possibly have an origin in Portuguese or Spanish - it seems that "vede" is a subjunctive form of "I impede", and "los" means "them" - but I'm not at all convinced that's where it came from!

I transcribed Lord Fear's other spells as "Zalash caralam" (turns Maldame to stone), "Zash caram" (displays Bhal-Shebah on his screen) and "Caram gar" (speeds up the Corridor of Blades). They seem to have some common elements, and feel more made-up than the Latin-esque ones. But who knows.

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Re: Phrases used in Knightmare

Post by Canadanne » Thu Dec 08, 2016 5:42 pm

Drassil wrote:
Canadanne wrote:Also, what's the origin of "Caras carom" and does it have a literal translation? He uses that to express a range of emotions including frustration, horror and delight.
I remember Robin/Mashibinbin once suggesting that the residence of Hordriss could be called Castle Carascaram. (We had Hordriss planned as a Knightmare RPG character at one point.) Whenever I try to consider the origin of the phrase, I end up imagining Hordriss singing along to The Pink Panther theme.
Canadanne wrote:I transcribed Lord Fear's other spells as "Zalash caralam" (turns Maldame to stone), "Zash caram" (displays Bhal-Shebah on his screen) and "Caram gar" (speeds up the Corridor of Blades). They seem to have some common elements, and feel more made-up than the Latin-esque ones. But who knows.
It may be worth noting that čarati means "to cast a spell, practise sorcery" in Serbo-Croat, with the second- and first-person forms being čaraš and čaram.

Merlin uses the exclamation "Spells and incantations!" at one point, so perhaps Hordriss' phrase means something similar?

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